Resilience

How the Best Get Better: Partnerships & a Trifecta Disaster

by Judy Kruger & Scott Harris -

Japan is more prepared for future disasters due to communications and annual investments into exercises and drills with local and international partners. Tokyo Disney Resort leveraged private-public partnerships to increase preparedness in employees, guests, business services, critical infrastructure facilities, and government stakeholders to manage future disruptions caused by natural disasters. A private-public partnership helped align business needs and supported risk-information decision-making during a complex, large-scale disaster.

Crowd Behavior & Elaborated Social Identity Modeling

by Robert Leverone -

Law enforcement agencies are tasked with protecting life and safety as well as the civil liberties of those within their jurisdictions. Crowds present even more complex and dynamic scenarios. However, this research on crowd psychology can help law enforcement officers navigate these complexities on an operational level. Being able to gauge crowd behavior would help officers make more informed planning and response decisions and reduce the risk of civil unrest.

Suburban Fire Operations: Five Lessons Learned

by Randall W. Hanifen -

From small fire companies covering large areas of rural land to large fire departments covering highly populated urban cities, suburban fire departments are tasked with a mixture of both. One firefighter who has spent his career in a suburban fire department shares the five key lessons he has learned throughout his career.

Disaster Procurement: Navigating the Supply Chain

by Brian McGinley -

There are moments during a disaster that something needs to be purchased. Depending on the nature of the purchase, it could be something small, perhaps something that can be purchased with a company credit card. On the other hand, it could be a purchase for millions of dollars and, not only do procurement laws come into play, but so could federal procurement laws if the organization is going to seek Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reimbursement after the disaster closes. In the moments of needing to spend large dollar amounts, the procurement office should be consulted, not because all purchases need to go through that office, but because they work year-round to establish relationships, contracts, and price lists with suppliers that could save time, money, and allow focus to be on the disaster at hand.

Future-Proofing Infrastructure Supports Community Resilience

by Ryan Colker -

With communities around the globe feeling the effects of climate change, society must continue to prioritize initiatives that address its causes and impacts. For example, in mid-December 2021, 61 tornadoes formed in the central U.S. when such intense events are unusual, and Texas and Oklahoma saw a winter storm and freezing temperatures in February 2021. Additionally, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the U.S. experienced 20 major disasters in 2021 totaling $145 billion in damages and resulting in 688 deaths – ranking as the second-highest number of events, the third-highest cost, and the sixth highest deaths. Coupled with the continuation of high-powered storms with the rising costs of construction, labor, and materials, communities run the risk of entering an endless cycle of destruction and rebuilding.

Essentials of a School-Based Crisis Response Plan

by Mary Schoenfeldt -

School crisis response plans come in a variety of formats. Although the structure may vary, the content must include the essentials for the plan to be usable and effective. A basic school-based crisis response plan has seven key elements: organizing structure, communications system, accountability system, parent/student reunification, alternative location, equipment and supplies, and aftermath/recovery plan.

Predictable Surge: A Pilot in Providence

by Sara Kelly -

Collaboration between public entities and private companies is essential to prepare for disasters. However, current partnerships can be formal and cumbersome to the point of detriment, or impromptu and do little to achieve their goals. This unmet need to find appropriate partnership mechanisms could be addressed by the Harvard National Preparedness Leadership Initiative (NPLI)’s Predictable Surge framework, a model presented in Domestic Preparedness Journal in August 2019. It aims to inform an emergency manager’s understanding of the response ecosystem and productively engage potential private partners. This model has been further developed through a pilot with the Providence Emergency Management Agency (PEMA), located in Providence, Rhode Island, in the summer of 2021.

The Evolving Status of Emergency Management Organizations

by Kyle R. Overly -

The proliferation of climate change, political strife, and general societal divisiveness is changing the nature of the work of emergency managers. The (ongoing) COVID-19 global pandemic, devastating hurricane and wildfire seasons, tenuous political situations, and broad unrest impact local communities in significant ways. Emergency managers are those who officials trust to lead response and recovery to this growing list of emergencies and disasters. They facilitate multi-agency responses to complex incidents, often serving in silence while providing critical backbone services.

Transportation Security in a Holistic Homeland Security Enterprise

by Daniel Rector -

Transportation security is the act of ensuring the protection and continued functioning of mobility systems for both people and commerce. It includes air, maritime, and all forms of surface transport. Transportation security is an enormous undertaking involving all government levels, the private sector, volunteer organizations, and the public. These organizations must work together to identify, prepare for, and respond to any threats or hazards that could affect the transportation infrastructure or the people and goods that travel within it.

Resilience After 2021: Unfinished Business & Future Agenda

by Robert McCreight -

In 2021, many questions have been raised about resilience. Is more known about resilience and have more leverage tools been retained to establish resilience at will than a decade ago? What ideas and notions were expected 10 years ago in energizing resilience tasks, activities, and operations? Has the leverage needed been acquired to apply proven strategies and operational systems for implementing post-disaster resilience with skill and confidence? Did a collective experience with mega-disasters since 2011 equip communities with new and innovative pathways to achieve resilience? The answers to these questions are far less than clear.